Aladdin (2019)

Aladdin Poster

Director: Guy Ritchie

Screenwriters: John August and Guy Ritchie

Cast: Will Smith, Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott, Marwan Kenzari, and Nasim Pedrad

The Summer of Disney continues. Given that Disney has now officially acquired 21st Century Fox, virtually every major film release this year falls under the Disney umbrella including Captain Marvel, Avengers: Endgame, Dumbo, X-Men: Dark Phoenix, Aladdin, Toy Story 4, Spider-Man: Far From Home, The Lion King, Frozen 2, and Star Wars: Rise of Skywalker. That’s a hell of year, and every damn one of them is a remake or a sequel.

Speaking of this synergy, check out the similarities of three of these films’ posters, all released within one month!

Avengers, Dark Phoenix and Aladdin posters.
Innovate much?

When it comes to the latest live-action remake of a beloved Disney animated classic – Guy Ritchie’s Aladdin, I am of two minds. I have always said that my modus operandi as a critic is to rate films on the simple principle of if it’s worth your money. Films aimed at a family audience are generally the toughest to rank in this regard because the money factor in play can quickly get out of hand. Two adults, two kids, and even the most modest concessions will easily run you upwards of $70 in most multiplexes nowadays. For just a few bucks more, you can buy a ticket to the Magic Kingdom and meet Jasmine in person! So the money factor needs to satisfy the fact that such an outing is entertaining to the kids but also not just tolerable but substantially fun for adults beyond just waiting for Disney+ to stream it in November.

Disney has found the blueprint for these remakes at this point. Find an established director (or create your own in the case of Pete’s Dragon’s David Lowery), write a new song, and cast one mega-star to handle your built-in PR. See Cinderella, Pete’s Dragon, The Jungle Book, Beauty and the Beast, or Dumbo for evidence, and then just watch Lion King put a bow on top of all of them later this summer! Aladdin follows this design masterfully, and I will give my kid-stamp-of-approval right now without any haste. If your kids liked the previous remakes, your kids will like this movie. Even if they don’t know anything about Aladdin.

That being said, if you don’t know anything about Aladdin, here’s the gist. In the large kingdom of Agrabah, a young street urchin named Aladdin (Mena Massoud) has to steal to survive in the streets. His savvy wit and cunningness keep him out of trouble most days until a chance encounter with a woman he presumes is the princess’s handmaid is actually the actual Princess Jasmine (Naomi Scott). In classic Capulet/Montague fashion, there’s no future for a street rat and a princess, but when the Sultan’s Grand Vizier, Jafar (Marwan Kenzari) offers Aladdin rich rewards if he retrieves a magic lamp for him from an enchanted cave. Aladdin reluctantly agrees, but is double-crossed by Jafar only to find himself trapped in the cave with only a magic carpet, his pet monkey Abu, and of course one magic lamp that happens to have a genie (Will Smith) who has the power to make his wishes come true!

If you are familiar with the Disney animated version from 1992, the first thing you need to do is separate your expectations. If you know anything about director, Guy Ritchie, you’d know that he’s a style above substance kind of guy. While he sticks to the script more or less, he will sacrifice some of the signature moments to add some of his own. This is not a critique, as a remake or reboot most certainly should innovate from its predecessor, but it’s a careful balance of familiar and new that must be maintained.

The most glaringly obvious example of this element is with the arrival of the Genie played by Will Smith. Unless you lived under a rock or really unless you were buried in the Cave of Wonders, you are familiar with the singularly exceptional performance Robin Williams gave as the Genie in the original film. Williams’s performance was on par with one of the best if not the best voice performances of all time, and sliding a new face (and voice) into the role is not without its risks. I am however, baffled and pleased to report that Smith does not just provide a serviceable performance here, but one that is both worthy of the role and perhaps his best in over a decade. Smith goes all-in as the Genie, harnessing all the charm and charisma he’s capable of, which is a lot! He also is key in the film’s most charming detail regarding the way the overall story of the film is delivered.

Ritchie wisely allows Smith to command his scenes with an immense amount of freedom, and those are the scenes that shine and are extremely memorable. He also invokes a touch of Bollywood style in the song and dance scenes, a lavish and welcomed addition to the visual palate. Ritchie’s inability to get out of his own way, however, does result in some corny use of slow-motion as well as a missed opportunity in terms of his treatment of Jafar. The biggest qualm I have with the film rests on Jafar’s cardboard development and Ritchie’s botching of the film’s climax, which also heavily involves Jafar. The climax is also unsettlingly and unnecessarily scary for little kids – a strange trait of recent Disney fare including Wreck-It Ralph 2: Ralph Breaks the Internet, where 100 minutes mood establishment is suddenly shattered by uncharacteristically creepy atmosphere and plot design.

That being said, what Aladdin does well highly outweighs what it does not. The music and songs famously scored and written by Alan Menken are all present and delivered amicably. A notable delight is Naomi Scott as Jasmine who not only embodies a “princess” for today’s day and age, but also is a tremendously talented singer who not only delivers on “A Whole New World,” but also impresses on “Speechless,” a catchy, empowering solo-song for Jasmine, and the only entirely new song in the film. My daughter and son already know all the words and sing it endlessly.

Aladdin represents yet another overall success with this Disney experiment of remaking their beloved animated films in live-action.  While it’s not the best of the bunch, it’s not the worst by any stretch. Audiences of all ages will find something to enjoy, especially the performances by Will Smith and Naomi Scott. B

My daughter at the movies
Proof that I understand the cost of family trips to the movies!

Aladdin is rated PG and has a running time of 2 hours and 8 minutes.

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