It: Chapter 2 (2019)

Director: Andy Muschietti

Screenwriter: Gary Dauberman

Cast: Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, Bill Hader, Isaiah Mustafa, and Bill Skarsgård

Is It good? Does It get better or worse? How much money did It make? Should I see It before I see It 2? I will answer these confusing questions and more in my review of blockbuster horror sequel, It: Chapter 2.

As horror sequels go, this is one of those perfect studio no-brainer scenarios. Hey, we have the rights to remake this film adaptation of this really beloved horror novel, and we just have too much material! Let’s make two movies. Better yet, let’s split the films so that the first one covers the children storyline, and the second covers the adult plot. Brilliant! And that’s how the highest grossing horror film of all time came to be.

That’s right, as readers of Stephen King’s bestselling novel know, every 27 years, a monstrous demon and “Eater of Worlds” comes to feed on fear, preferring children because their fears are easier to elicit. To the kids from the first film, this demon manifests as a dancing clown known as Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), who preys on them until they seriously wound it, sending it back to the nether-regions from whence it came…until now. 27 years later, The Losers Club is all grown up, but the past is not done with them yet.

The film opens with some really effective horror that gets the attention of Mike (Isaiah Mustafa), the only member of the Losers Club who remained in Derry, Maine. The event reminds Mike of the pact they all made as kids after vanquishing Pennywise; if it comes back they all come back. And remembering is key because it turns out if one leaves Derry, the memory of what happened there fades away, so Mike is the only one who fully remembers what happened all those years ago. The film’s first act essentially follows Mike’s contacting of each member of the group convincing each to return, moving the plot forward as well as reintroducing us to each of the characters, all now grown adults. The casting of the adult characters is very spot on including the aforementioned Mike, chubby intellectual, turned hunk Ben, (Jay Ryan), chatterbox Richie (Bill Hader), asthmatic Eddie (James Ransone), neurotic Stanley (Andy Bean), ringleader Bill (James McAvoy), and outcast Beverly (Jessica Chastain). This first section of the film is quite engaging and works very well as both character and plot driven story that balances humor and drama nicely.

Unfortunately, when they are all inevitably reunited, the movie starts to drag a bit. The film wisely continues to play games tonally with the audience. One moment we’re gripped with intensity and another, we’re laughing (this tone is perfectly signified by the Stephen King cameo mid-way through the film). Unfortunately, while the Pennywise threat is real, and the conflict is clear, I didn’t feel the critical nature of what was at stake this time around. There’s an odd sense surrounding the action in this film in terms of what is experienced by individuals, what is experienced by the group, and what is really happening in the physical world. This confusion distracts from the action lessening the film’s impact. An impact that has tremendous potential. It was conceived by Stephen King to be a novel about primal fear – the things that scare us as a child and how those things stay with us and haunt us long after. I’m not sure the execution quite hits the mark when all is said and done. However, I do think the sequel is serviceable and most will walk away satisfied and entertained, as long as they can tolerate the nearly three-hour running time! B

It: Chapter 2 is rated R and has a running time of 2 hours and 49 minutes.

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