Doctor Sleep

Director: Mike Flanagan

Screenwriter: Mike Flanagan

Cast: Ewan McGregor, Rebecca Ferguson, Kyliegh Curran, Cliff Curtis, and Carel Struycken

When I heard that a film adaptation was in the works for Doctor Sleep, Stephen King’s sequel to his 1977 novel The Shining, I admit I was worried. When I read the 2013 novel, I remember immediately thinking, “Well, this will never work as a film.” Then, to my surprise, within a few years, it’s announced that it’s already in production, and with the talented horror-guru Mike Flanagan (Haunting of Hill House, Hush) as writer/director. That’s enough to get me in the theater, and fortunately, Doctor Sleep does not disappoint.

As I mentioned, Doctor Sleep is Stephen King’s long awaited follow up to his horror classic, The Shining. The original film version of The Shining from 1980 directed by Stanley Kubrick has taken on a life and mythology of its own being hailed as one of the greatest horror films of all time as well as inspiring countless stories and documentaries about some of the strange occurrences associated with the production. Doctor Sleep picks up 30 years after the events at the Overlook Hotel from the original novel. Danny, now going by Dan (Ewan McGregor), is a fully grown, recovering alcoholic, and still has the shine, a term referring to his psychic abilities. Dan’s pretty messed up as one tends to be after a haunted hotel possesses your dad leading him to chase you and your mom around with an axe and just murder a bunch of people before freezing to death in a hedge maze. Oh…spoiler alert.

Now, Dan is sort of a lost soul leading him to taking a job as a hospice nurse, a job that puts his abilities to good use, as his shine gives him an uncanny ability to help soothe the dying in their final moments – subsequently earning him the nickname Doctor Sleep. The shining is a pretty valuable thing – even more so to a group of steam-punk looking, cultish demons known as the True Knot. Lead by ancient matriarch, Rose the Hat (Rebecca Ferguson), the True Knot travels by RV across the country seeking out those with the shine, torturing them, and then devouring their essence, which they call steam. It’s a motley crew of weridos with weird names to say the least (a tip of the cap to Twin Peaks’s Carel Struycken as Grandpa Flick). They survive on steam and it must be extracted through pain and torture, which results in some very unsettling scenes in the film.

When the True Knot sense the presence of a young girl named Abra (Kyliegh Curran) who possesses incredibly strong abilities, Rose and her band of scoundrels look to hunt her down. Abra reaches out to Dan asking for his help to stop the True Knot from capturing and killing more people in their caravan of death!

I enjoyed Doctor Sleep much more than I expected I would. The performances are good, especially by Rebecca Ferguson as Rose. The horror is quite terrifying in parts, and while The Shining is on a different plane in terms of achievement and experience, Doctor Sleep is a well-told, strongly designed sequel. The nods to the first film are appropriate, but this is a fully realized, complete story all on its own. The adaptation from the source material is extremely faithful in most respects, but Flanagan also takes some massive left turns in other places, most notably with when Abra’s powers manifest and with the film’s ending. Stephen King said in an interview that it is important for readers to understand that the novel Doctor Sleep is a sequel to the novel The Shining and not the film. I think Flanagan took to that approach with this film in that the movie Doctor Sleep is a sequel to the movie The Shining and not the book, therefore the choices he made to deviate from the book make sense to the characters as we know them from the movie (even though I would have loved to see the novel’s ending play out in the film).

Doctor Sleep does what it set out to do very well. It invokes the spirit of The Shining without needlessly relying on it to stay above water. The inexplicable 152-minute running time does unsurprisingly result in the occasional drag here and there, especially in the first act. Still, there’s plenty that works and more than enough play in this film to keep Doctor Sleep from being a dull boy. B+

Doctor Sleep is rated R and has a running time of 2 hours and 32 minutes.

The Meg

MEGDirector: Jon Turtletaub

Screenwriters: Dean Georgaris, Jon Hoeber, and Erich Hoeber

Cast: Jason Statham, Li Bingbing, Rainn Wilson, Cliff Curtis, and Masi Oka

When a movie nails expectations, even expectations that are modest and purposefully withdrawn, does that mean it’s good? This is the question we must ask ourselves when describing The Meg, the latest crazy summer shark movie.

The Meg follows a Naval marine biologist played by Jason Statham (just go with it) named Jonas Taylor. After a mishap during a top secret exploratory mission in the Mariana Trench, Taylor is disgraced having abandoned half his crew and aborting his mission due to his sighting of a 70-foot long shark-like creature that no one else saw. Believing he was crazy or that the decompression sickness had made him delusional, Taylor is dishonorably discharged from his Naval position and from the project.

Five years later a submersible and crew are lost in the same area of the Trench where Taylor believed he saw the massive sea monster. The Naval research group privately funded by billionaire, Jack Morris (Rainn Wilson) has yielded some results, discovering a completely new ecosystem below the originally perceived base of the Mariana Trench. This ecosystem is protected by a cloud of gasses allowing the temperature below the cloud to support abundant sea life. Believed to be the only person on earth with the experience and training at such a depth, Taylor is hesitantly recruited back to assist with the search and rescue for the lost submersible. Reluctantly, Taylor agrees in the hopes to regain his honor and prove that the creature exists. Guess what? It does.

The Meg proceeds like every monster movie, only this one is in the ocean. The Meg (short for Megalodon) escapes the depths via a plume of warmer temperature water created by the Naval submersibles penetrating the gas cloud. Now, free to roam the Pacific, Taylor and his crew must attempt to capture the beast before it can cause catastrophic consequences to mankind. The film is actually a lot of fun. Taylor’s team includes all the archetypes we love to see mix it up: the fallen hero, the corporate businessman, the misinformed expert, and the strong-headed scientist, and a Terrier named Pippin.

The Meg is mostly brain candy. It’s like a Michael Bay movie before he totally lost his mind. The performances are weak, the premise is silly, and the story is predictable, but that’s what I thought it would be, and that’s kind of what I wanted it to be. So is it good. The short answer is, yes. The silly premise is not unlike most films in the genre, which is serviceable that some event allows this merging of worlds. It’s nearly 2 hours, but it’s a pretty tight 113 minutes. Most importantly, nearly all of the $130 million dollar budget appears to have been used on the shark, and it works. There are a nice pile of quality visuals presented here. The film has a clear intention of devouring Chinese box offices as well setting an outstanding and highly anticipated scene where the Meg terrorizes a busy beach of swimmers in China instead of San Diego as it happens in the book (yes this is an adaptation of a novel!).meg+banner

My overall point, is I’m a sucker for shark movies, and I like the popcorn element of this one more than many in recent years. I also like Jason Statham in this film, who is underrated in his ability to mix humor and action. He’s done this marvelously in films like Snatch and Spy, but here he does it in a movie that does not begin with the letter “S.” Hopefully this review has successfully communicated the esoteric appeal of this film, but if you fit the niche, dive in! B+

The Meg is rated PG-13 and has a running time of 1 hour and 53 minutes.