It: Chapter 2 (2019)

Director: Andy Muschietti

Screenwriter: Gary Dauberman

Cast: Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, Bill Hader, Isaiah Mustafa, and Bill Skarsgård

Is It good? Does It get better or worse? How much money did It make? Should I see It before I see It 2? I will answer these confusing questions and more in my review of blockbuster horror sequel, It: Chapter 2.

As horror sequels go, this is one of those perfect studio no-brainer scenarios. Hey, we have the rights to remake this film adaptation of this really beloved horror novel, and we just have too much material! Let’s make two movies. Better yet, let’s split the films so that the first one covers the children storyline, and the second covers the adult plot. Brilliant! And that’s how the highest grossing horror film of all time came to be.

That’s right, as readers of Stephen King’s bestselling novel know, every 27 years, a monstrous demon and “Eater of Worlds” comes to feed on fear, preferring children because their fears are easier to elicit. To the kids from the first film, this demon manifests as a dancing clown known as Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), who preys on them until they seriously wound it, sending it back to the nether-regions from whence it came…until now. 27 years later, The Losers Club is all grown up, but the past is not done with them yet.

The film opens with some really effective horror that gets the attention of Mike (Isaiah Mustafa), the only member of the Losers Club who remained in Derry, Maine. The event reminds Mike of the pact they all made as kids after vanquishing Pennywise; if it comes back they all come back. And remembering is key because it turns out if one leaves Derry, the memory of what happened there fades away, so Mike is the only one who fully remembers what happened all those years ago. The film’s first act essentially follows Mike’s contacting of each member of the group convincing each to return, moving the plot forward as well as reintroducing us to each of the characters, all now grown adults. The casting of the adult characters is very spot on including the aforementioned Mike, chubby intellectual, turned hunk Ben, (Jay Ryan), chatterbox Richie (Bill Hader), asthmatic Eddie (James Ransone), neurotic Stanley (Andy Bean), ringleader Bill (James McAvoy), and outcast Beverly (Jessica Chastain). This first section of the film is quite engaging and works very well as both character and plot driven story that balances humor and drama nicely.

Unfortunately, when they are all inevitably reunited, the movie starts to drag a bit. The film wisely continues to play games tonally with the audience. One moment we’re gripped with intensity and another, we’re laughing (this tone is perfectly signified by the Stephen King cameo mid-way through the film). Unfortunately, while the Pennywise threat is real, and the conflict is clear, I didn’t feel the critical nature of what was at stake this time around. There’s an odd sense surrounding the action in this film in terms of what is experienced by individuals, what is experienced by the group, and what is really happening in the physical world. This confusion distracts from the action lessening the film’s impact. An impact that has tremendous potential. It was conceived by Stephen King to be a novel about primal fear – the things that scare us as a child and how those things stay with us and haunt us long after. I’m not sure the execution quite hits the mark when all is said and done. However, I do think the sequel is serviceable and most will walk away satisfied and entertained, as long as they can tolerate the nearly three-hour running time! B

It: Chapter 2 is rated R and has a running time of 2 hours and 49 minutes.

American Made

AMDirector: Doug Liman

Screenwriter: Gary Spinelli

Cast: Tom Cruise, Domhnall Gleeson, Sarah Wright, and Jesse Plemons

I had an idea once for a movie where I’d pluck out a completely inconsequential character from a well-known film, and then base an entire story around that character. What I love most about this idea is that the film I write would stand firmly on its own two feet with no overt mention to the protagonist’s connection to the larger, famous work. Only those who pick up the subtle clues would ever even be able to connect them.

I had a similar experience watching American Made. I’ll admit that I am not up to date on my drug cartel history, but I do watch and love the Netflix series, Narcos. So as I’m sitting, watching, and enjoying Tom Cruise’s new film American Made, I suddenly start thinking, “I know the name Barry Seal. Wasn’t he in an episode of Narcos?” And then two things happened: 1. I felt what it would be like to have that revelation of realizing a frivolous character from one story is now the subject of another, and 2. I realized I knew everything that was going to happen in this movie. I loved realizing the first thing, but I was not as excited about realizing the second one.

The good news is I love Tom Cruise, and he made up for all the predictability that followed. So it turns out, yes, this is the story of Barry Seal – they guy from Season 1, Episode 4 of Narcos. Seal, played by Tom Cruise is a TWA pilot, who as America is in the grips of the Cold War during the 1970s catches the attention of a CIA agent, Monty Schafer (Domhnhall Gleeson). Seal has been smuggling Cuban cigar exiles into the states as a means of additional income, and Schafer sees Seal’s activity not so much as punishable but as exploitative. Schafer offers Seal a chance to work secretly for the government, taking reconnaissance photos of South American guerilla camps and delivering bribes to Nicaraguan and Panamanian politicians and military personnel for information.

Of course, the CIA doesn’t pay much, and Barry wants nothing more than to make a great life for his wife Lucy (Sarah Wright) and kids. That being said, it doesn’t take long for the Columbian drug cartel headed by Jorge Ochoa (Alejandro Edda), Carlos Ledher (Fredy Yate Escobar), and an up-and-coming-kid Pablo Escobar (Mauricio Mejía) to take notice of an American spy plane running in and out of South America on a pretty regular basis. The cartel sees Seal’s activity not so much as punishable but as exploitative…rinse, wash, repeat (see what I did there?).

The movie spends the rest of its focus watching Seal bounce back and forth between running drugs for the cartel and informing on “Commies” for the CIA. Meanwhile Seal just keeps getting richer, and richer and richer.

Still, the movie doesn’t jive like I wanted it to. I think director Doug Liman and screenwriter, Gary Spinelli bet on the fact that most people who see this film wouldn’t have seen episode 4 of Narcos. I also think they knew Tom Cruise in a plane is something people enjoy. Additionally, this marks the second collaboration between Liman and Cruise after 2014’s Edge of Tomorrow, or was it called Live Die Repeat? No one knows for sure. Anyway, that was a great movie and Liman directed the hell out of it, a film which was basically Groundhog Day meets Terminator and has Cruise reporting to Brenden Gleeson. So why couldn’t Doug Liman direct the hell out of a movie that is basically The Wolf of Wall Street meets Top Gun where Cruise is reporting to Dohmnall Gleeson? He can and he pretty much does. Liman gets a great performance out of Cruise, and a little birdy tells me there are at least two more Liman/Cruise joints in the works. This is good news.

What doesn’t quite jive for me in this film are the circumstances, a deficit that I think mostly falls on the writing. There is a lot of coincidence and shrugging off of impossible situations in American Made. At one moment Seal is in a Columbian prison as government agents are about to raid his New Orleans home with his family asleep inside. The next moment, Seal and his family are living in Arkansas and they own an airplane hanger. It’s not quite that sudden, but it’s pretty close. Gleeson’s Agent Schafer character is also oddly underdeveloped and while I understand his persona is supposed to be mysterious, he seems contradictory and far more dramatic than necessary. Lastly, Jesse Plemons is in this movie as a local sheriff, and I have to assume there is a cache of great footage of him on the cutting room floor somewhere because what’s left of his character is barely an arc.

All in all, Cruise continues to entertain and gives more than just an action-packed performance. In a fall season where all there is to see is It for the 10th time, this is a worthy film that has far more high points than low ones. B

American Made is rated R and has a running time of 1 hour and 55 minutes.

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